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May 20, 2024 11:10 AM
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City of Prescott Outlines Plan for Surface Water Recharge

Photo: Willow Lake

As we enter spring, the City of Prescott begins its annual surface water recharge from Watson and Willow Lakes. This means, that starting April 1st, surface water is moved from the lakes and transported to the recharge basins at the Airport Water Reclamation Facility for recharge back into the ground.

Recharge will begin first at Willow Lake because of impending sewer main upgrades along the Willow Lake corridor.  The lake will be reduced to approximately 9.5 feet below the spillway, which is well below normal conditions. This will allow areas around the lake to dry in anticipation of sewer work in the area beginning in August 2024. Once Willow Lake reaches this level, recharge efforts will cease at Willow Lake and move to Watson Lake.

Watson Lake water level is currently 1.5 feet below the spillway.  Once recharge begins, it will continue until the lake water level is approximately 3 feet below the spillway, which is 1.5 feet below the current level.  Upon reaching this goal, recharge will cease from both lakes until monsoon moisture arrives.

The water levels at the Upper and Lower Goldwater Lakes will be lowered to the summer recreation level of 3 feet below the spillway. The Goldwater release flows are currently feeding into Granite Creek and from there into Watson Lake.

Once all the lakes reach these levels, the city will reevaluate the surface water supply and either continue surface water recharge or stop for the season.  The city may legally recharge surface water until November 30th.  The City endeavors to balance the needs of surface water recharge, lake health and recreational uses.

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One Response

  1. So…..is this good news, bad news….or WHAT? What are the short term and long term effects and how does this news affect the residents of Prescott and the surrounding area? If your writer is going to tease the reader with such apparent “news,” he/she should not stop short, as was the case here.

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