water conservation

Town of Prescott Valley

The Antelope Park Splash Pad in Prescott Valley has officially opened

The Antelope Park Splash Pad opened officially today, Monday July 18th. This splash pad cost $360,000 and is equipped with a recirculation pump designed to conserve water. Having free splash pads for families to enjoy has been a goal of mine since running for Mayor four years ago and thanks to staff and a family

Water

Arizona Water Protection Fund Accepting Applications for Fiscal Year 2023 Grant Cycle

The Arizona Water Protection Fund (AWPF) supports projects that develop or implement on the ground measures that directly maintain, enhance and restore Arizona’s river and riparian resources. The AWPF Commission will be accepting applications for the Fiscal Year 2023 grant cycle, and will award grants under three categories: capital projects, research, and water conservation. The

Water

Las Vegas water intake now visible at drought-stricken Lake Mead

Photo: This photo taken Monday, April 25, 2022, by the Southern Nevada Water Authority shows the top of Lake Mead drinking water Intake No. 1 above the surface level of the Colorado River reservoir behind Hoover Dam A massive drought-starved reservoir on the Colorado River has become so depleted that Las Vegas now is pumping

City of Prescott

Talk of the Town – Prescott Mayor Phil Goode

Just last week, Prescott City Council approved a new water policy, one that is designed to help us properly manage this precious resource.  For many years, the City has offered programs to encourage our citizens to conserve water at home.  The City offers a series of rebates for homeowners who upgrade their appliances and fixtures

Nature

Race is on to Save the Great Salt Lake: Will it be Enough?

The largest natural lake west of the Mississippi is shrinking past its lowest levels in recorded history, raising fears about toxic dust, ecological collapse and economic consequences. But the Great Salt Lake may have some new allies: conservative Republican lawmakers. The new burst of energy from the GOP-dominated state government comes after lake levels recently

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