U.S. Supreme Court

Legal Beat

Key Supreme Court Cases and Issues for the New Term

The most important and high-profile case the U.S. Supreme Court will hear in the upcoming 2021-2022 term that begins in October revisits Roe v. Wade. There’s no way to overstate how important Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization is, as this case has the potential to fundamentally rewrite the law of the land regarding abortion. Aside

Opinion

Opinion – Why the ACA won: how politics are different in court

The Supreme Court recently released a ruling on a case involving the Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly known as Obamacare. In the zero-sum world of politics, Democrats won, and Republicans lost. While half the country celebrates and the other half grudgingly accepts the ruling, a few people may wonder why the Supreme Court, largely seen

Legal Beat

High court limits when police can enter home without warrant

Adding to the country’s ongoing discussion of the extent of police powers, the Supreme Court on Wednesday put limits on when police officers pursuing a fleeing suspect can enter a home without a warrant. The high court ruled that when officers are pursuing someone suspected of a misdemeanor, a less serious crime, they cannot always

Legal Beat

Academic benefits a go: NCAA loses Supreme Court case on compensation

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that the NCAA’s attempts to limit education-related benefits for athletes violate antitrust law in a unanimous decision that could pave the way for further rulings on athlete compensation. The ruling means schools can go beyond tuition scholarships to cover cost of attendance, and pay for personal laptops, tutors and even musical instruments

Health

‘Obamacare’ survives: Supreme Court dismisses big challenge

The Supreme Court, though increasingly conservative in makeup, rejected the latest major Republican-led effort to kill the national health care law known as “Obamacare” on Thursday, preserving insurance coverage for millions of Americans. The justices, by a 7-2 vote, left the entire Affordable Care Act intact in ruling that Texas, other GOP-led states and two

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