Taliban

Afghanistan

Crush at Kabul airport kills 7 as Afghans try to flee

At least seven Afghans died in a panicked crush of people trying to enter Kabul’s international airport, the British military said Sunday, as thousands were still trying to flee the country in a chaotic exodus a week after the Taliban takeover. The Taliban moved to confront the first stirrings of armed resistance since capturing nearly

Afghanistan

Europe fears Afghan refugee crisis after Taliban takeover

From above, the new border wall separating Turkey from Iran looks like a white snake winding through the barren hills. So far it only covers a third of the 540-kilometer (335-mile) border, leaving plenty of gaps for migrants to slip across in the dead of night. Traffic on this key migration route from central Asia

Opinion

Opinion: Our Rulers Never Learn

[Disclaimer: The views expressed in opinion pieces on the PrescotteNews website are solely those of the authors. These opinions do not necessarily represent those of the staff of Prescott eNews or its publisher.] They made the same mistakes in Afghanistan they make at home. On August 15, Kabul surrendered to the Taliban. Helicopters rushed Americans

Afghanistan

Taliban promise women’s rights, security under Islamic rule

The Taliban vowed Tuesday to respect women’s rights, forgive those who fought them and ensure Afghanistan does not become a haven for terrorists as part of a publicity blitz aimed at reassuring world powers and a fearful population. Following a lightning offensive across Afghanistan that saw many cities fall to the insurgents without a fight,

Afghanistan

Taliban allowing ‘safe passage’ from Kabul in US airlift

Photo: Afghan citizens pack inside a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III, as they are transported from Hamid Karzai International Airport in Afghanistan, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2021.  (Capt. Chris Herbert/U.S. Air Force via AP) The Taliban have agreed to allow “safe passage” from Afghanistan for civilians struggling to join a U.S.-directed airlift from the capital,

Afghanistan

Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefited Taliban

Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters

Scroll to Top