pandemic

Opinion

Opinion: Navigating the Uncertainty of Returning to School

The 2021-2022 academic year is starting and there is a lot of fear and uncertainty about it, especially as the pandemic continues. News about it is everywhere and some of it is confusing and overwhelming, even for those in the medical field. A myriad of questions remains unanswered. However, as schools reopen, there is one

Housing

How COVID-19 and red tape pushed millions to the brink of homelessness

Barbara Nelson likes to watch her Phoenix neighborhood from her south-facing window, where grayish stucco and sturdy tile roofs give the buildings a clean facade. But the view inside her home is much less tidy. Nelson, who has lived here a year, is one of several residents at the complex who have risked eviction during

State

Half of Arizonans have suffered from ‘pandemic brain’, reveals survey

29% say boredom has been the overriding emotion during the pandemic.  Respondents believe ‘Gen Z’ has missed out the most during social isolation. Devoid of social interaction over the past year, many of us are well-acquainted with being bored at home. You’ve read every magazine and watched your entire Netflix list; started a garden (which

Population Changes

Census shows US is diversifying, white population shrinking

The U.S. became more diverse and more urban over the past decade, and the non-Hispanic white population dropped for the first time on record, the Census Bureau reported Thursday as it released a trove of demographic data that will be used to redraw the nation’s political maps. The new figures offered the most detailed portrait

National

Politics by proxy: Arizona House members cast hundreds of remote votes

More than half of Arizona’s House delegation cast votes by proxy this year, including two who were among the top remote voters in Congress and another who once called proxy voting “shameful and unconstitutional” but did it anyway. They were in good company: 260 lawmakers had cast at least one vote by proxy this year

Population Changes

New census data expected to reveal a more diverse America

Almost 120 years ago, African American domestic workers settled in the Como neighborhood of Fort Worth, Texas, where they held Fourth of July parades, patronized shops on Horne Street and lived for several generations in what seemed like a small town within the big city. But many young families started moving away at the end

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