identity theft

Employment

Fraud overwhelms pandemic-related unemployment programs

With the floodgates set to open on another round of unemployment aid, states are being hammered with a new wave of fraud as they scramble to update security systems and block scammers who already have siphoned billions of dollars from pandemic-related jobless programs. The fraud is fleecing taxpayers, delaying legitimate payments and turning thousands of

Taxes

Watch Out for Identity Theft Thieves during Tax Season

The Arizona Department of Revenue (ADOR) takes identity theft seriously and reminds taxpayers that tax filing season is a time to be aware of identity thieves looking for ways to commit tax fraud. The department points to phishing schemes, card-skimming devices, unsecure Wi-Fi networks, data breaches, computer viruses, unsafe smartphone apps, and hacking email accounts

Taxes

All taxpayers now eligible for Identity Protection PINs

The Internal Revenue Service today expanded the Identity Protection PIN Opt-In Program to all taxpayers who can verify their identities. The Identity Protection PIN (IP PIN) is a six-digit code known only to the taxpayer and to the IRS. It helps prevent identity thieves from filing fraudulent tax returns using a taxpayers’ personally identifiable information.

Taxes

ADOR Continues to Fight Evolving Tax Fraud Schemes – Three Tax Return Schemes

Identity thieves are always looking for new ways to scam or steal taxpayers’ identities, including phishing schemes, card-skimming devices, unsecure Wi-Fi networks, data breaches, computer viruses, unsafe smartphone apps, and hacking email accounts. The Arizona Department of Revenue (ADOR) treats detecting and stopping fraud with paramount importance. ADOR continues to fight and shut down fraudulent

National

Scammers seize on US election, but it’s not votes they want

The email from a political action committee seemed harmless: if you support Joe Biden, it urged, click here to make sure you’re registered to vote. But Harvard University graduate student Maya James did not click. Instead, she Googled the name of the soliciting PAC. It didn’t exist — a clue the email was a phishing

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