hospitals

Cybercrime

Global war on ransomware? Hurdles hinder the US response

Foreign keyboard criminals with scant fear of repercussions have paralyzed U.S. schools and hospitals, leaked highly sensitive police files, triggered fuel shortages and, most recently, threatened global food supply chains. The escalating havoc caused by ransomware gangs raises an obvious question: Why has the United States, believed to have the world’s greatest cyber capabilities, looked

COVID-19

Filipinos make up 30% of COVID-19 deaths among nurses in U.S., study says

Filipino nurses make up just 4% of the national nursing workforce, but according to National Nurses United, 30.1% of registered nurses who’ve died of COVID-19 in the U.S. were Filipino. Nurses of color make up about 57.7% of all RNs who have died of COVID-19, said National Nurses United, which represents 170,000 nurses. Since March of last year,

COVID-19

Playing favorites? Hospital boards, donors get COVID shots

While millions of Americans wait for the COVID-19 vaccine, hospital board members, their trustees and donors around the country have gotten early access to the scarce drug or offers for vaccinations, raising complaints about favoritism tainting decisions about who gets inoculated and when. In Rhode Island, Attorney General Peter Neronha opened an inquiry after reports

State

Governor Ducey Extends “Good Samaritan” Protections For Frontline Workers

Governor Doug Ducey  extended an Executive Order to attract additional hospital staffing, boost existing medical staff, and provide clarity on liability protections available to health care professionals serving on the frontlines of the COVID-19 crisis. “We are fully committed to protecting Arizona’s health care heroes,” said Governor Ducey. “The extension of the ‘Good Samaritan’ order

COVID-19

Ducey rejects new COVID-19 limit, as models foresee swamped hospitals

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey again rejected calls for tougher statewide COVID-19 restrictions Wednesday in the face of what experts called a pending “catastrophe,” opting instead for more funding for nurses and more pleas for personal responsibility. Ducey also ordered insurance companies to cover the costs of COVID-19 vaccinations, which could arrive in the state as

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