Congressional Budget Office

Opinion

Opinion: When the Facts Don’t Fit, Lie

As sure as the sun will rise in the east, we will hear American politicians calling for the rich to pay “their fair share.” But it seems those who make that call go out of their way to avoid the evidence that sits right in front of them. Each year, the Congressional Budget Office publishes

Taxes

“Paying Their Fair Share.” But What’s Fair?

Exhibiting no self-awareness, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren (worth $2.5 million and $12 million, respectively) yell the loudest about the rich having to “pay their fair share.” President Joe Biden has, predictably, joined this tin-eared chorus. Yet none of them will ever say what that fair share is. Each year, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) asks Americans how much

Opinion

Opinion – Young Taxpayers, Please Don’t Read This: Some Big Tax Bills Are in Your Future

Our country possibly needs an Ernest Hollings or a Bill Proxmire, legendary senators who battled overspending. That’s because the idea of the big-spending federal government, an apparently bi-partisan Keynesian idea that huge government spending always creates prosperity, is hugely popular. Congress and the Biden administration are pushing a new nearly $2 trillion stimulus spending package.

Opinion

Opinion: A $15 Minimum Wage Hurts Vulnerable Workers the Most

Millions of hourly workers could lose their jobs if Democrats raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Many House and Senate Democrats are still pushing the Raise the Wage Act, which would more than double the current minimum wage by 2025. Though they advocated a $15 federal minimum wage for years, the legislation is

Opinion

Opinion: Why Have Federal Unemployment Benefits Cost So Much More Than Expected?

The March 2020 CARES Act expanded unemployment benefits for millions of laid off workers, many of whom will benefit from program extensions into 2021 included in Congress’ new relief bill. Unofficial estimates suggest the latest extensions will cost $120 billion. That begs the question — how well did Congress’ scorekeepers do in projecting the cost of the opening

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